Is It Physical or Mental?

Contrary to what my social media may portray, working in assisted living is not all bus outings and puppy kisses. A decent amount of my time is spent not with my residents, but communicating with their loved ones, whether in person, over the phone, or via email. While I really enjoy that part of my role, too, it can sometimes be extremely challenging. I held a family meeting yesterday with one of my favorite nonna’s son and daughter-in-law. She’s currently rehabbing at our post acute care and will likely end up staying there long term. When conveying our nursing home recommendation to her family, my coworkers and I were met with sadness and confusion. “Is it physical?” her son asked. “Is that why she has to stay here? Or is it mental?” The short (but complicated) answer: it’s kind of both.

This particular nonna, who I’ll call M, is physically in pretty good shape. Granted, she’s in a wheelchair, but she can self-propel and get around on her own. She can bear her own weight and really just needs someone on stand-by when she does things like shower and get ready in the morning. Cognitively, she’s in the earlier stages of dementia and is pleasantly confused. She knows exactly who we are and has no problem telling us how she feels (read: she can be super cranky). Her reality orientation is a bit off and we have to remind her when it’s time for lunch, but she has more good days than bad ones. Doesn’t sound like M’s necessarily nursing home appropriate, right? Here’s where that confusion and the “kind of” come into play.

M is both prideful and forgetful. She not only wants to do things on her own, she forgets that she can’t. If she tries and fails, she’s not sure how to call for help; though she has an emergency pendant and pull cords throughout her apartment, they’re essentially useless as she won’t remember how to use them. Assisted living, in her case, is a recipe for disaster; despite the fact that she’s not too clinically or mentally compromised, she has very poor safety awareness and, as a result, falls constantly. It’s no secret that one bad spill can be incredibly dangerous for someone elderly and in her condition.

Dementia affects various parts of the brain differently. The frontal lobe, which is responsible for things like judgment, impulse control, and spontaneity, can be a game changer if impaired. There’s no reasoning with someone who lacks judgment, either. I wish with my entire heart that I could convince M it’s not safe to try to walk, to shower by herself, or to keep her door locked. I want her to stay with me for so many reasons, and I know her family does too. Safety is always top priority, however, no matter how or why it’s compromised (physically, mentally, or kind of both).

One thought on “Is It Physical or Mental?

  1. As I read this. I recall being in this exact situation with my mom . It was such a difficult time for her and us. You expressed yourself perfectly

    Like

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